Author Spotlight: Kathryn Blade

Neece Editorial would like to present Kathryn Blade, our Wednesday Author Spotlight!

Who is Kathryn Blade?

Kathryn Blade was born in 1962. She lives in the Appalachian Mountains with her husband and daughter. She as a substance abuse counselor. Kathryn recently began writing creatively after an extended hiatus she took to focus on a professional career. The fire to write returned again in March 2019. She has published four novellas: Only YouAngel In The SnowPlay Upon My Heart and Emerald Fire. She has published two short stories: The Road to Nowhere and Nana’s Going Home

Want to know more about Kathryn?

Check her out on social media or her website:

website: www.kathrynbladeauthor.com

Social media: 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kathryn.blade.50

Twitter: https://twitter.com/blade_kathryn

Wattpad: www.wattpad.com/kathrynblade

website: www.kathrynbladeauthor.com

Interview:

  1. What genre/s do you write in? And why? I write in the romance genre. I fell in love with romance books at an early age. The Flame and The Flower by Kathleen Woodiwiss was the first romance to have an impact on me. I fell in love with her style of writing and the love story between Brandon and Heather that started out on extremely rocky ground. It has the happily-ever-after ending that I adore. Shouldn’t we all be happy in life?
  2. Tell me about your WIP.  My current WIP is a contemporary erotic romance. The story is between two people who meet and fall in love only to tormented by an antagonist from the female MC’s past. They have an amazing physical attraction and love that strengthens their fight to survive tough times. There are plot twists galore and lots of hot sex.
  3. What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why? Kathleen Woodiwiss. I adore her writing style and the love stories she created.
  4. What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? I try to write every day. Most of the time I write at my desk on a desktop computer. I start the writing day out with coffee. Then I put on some good music that inspires me and get started. I write mostly early in the morning. If I have time during my workday I use the Google Docs app on my smartphone and write. Most of my written work has been created on my smartphone.
  5. What do you think makes a good story or poem? Interesting characters and a good plot are important to make a good story.
  6. If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why? Slow down and don’t rush the process. It isn’t a race. Let your work sit for at least a month before forging onward with it.
  7. What’s your day job? I work as a substance abuse counselor.
  8. Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? I love to read, quilt, and spend time with my husband and daughter.
  9. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel? Scorched by Lizzie Prince. I’m so shocked that more people are not going insane over this love story.
  10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have? I have two half-finished books and three unpublished books.
  11. Do you believe in writer’s block? I believe every writer will face times when they cannot write. I am unhappy with how my current WIP is going. I feel there is more that I can add to the story to make it come alive. I can’t write until I figure that out in my head.
  12. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones? I occasionally will read book reviews. If a bad review has constructive criticism I use it to improve my work. If it’s just someone bashing my work with no feedback on how I can improve, I ignore those. Not everyone will get or like my writing. It’s taken a long time to understand that but I’m ok with that fact now.
  13. Are you a plotter or a pantser? Pantser with a small amount of plotting that takes place prior to the actual start of the book. I know what I want to happen in the book but don’t stick to an outline as I feel it stifles my creative process.
  14. What author/books are you currently reading? Helen Hardt’s Steel Brothers saga and E. L. James’ Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy are my latest reading of published works. I am reading numerous books as a beta reader but can’t divulge who or what I am reading.
  15. As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing? From my writing I want people to remember that we can change our lives and have a happily-ever-after ending if we truly want that. As for me? I hope they remember what a character I am. I’m eccentric as heck, a straight shooter, crabby at times, but have a heart as big as Texas.

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Advertisements

Author Spotlight: Derra Sabo

Neece Editorial would like to present Derra Sabo, our Monday Author Spotlight!

Who is Derra Sabo?

My name is Derra Sabo and I have been a SoCal resident my entire life. Writing started out as an escape for me, a way to get out all of the stressful and sometimes dark thoughts spinning around in my head. Being born with a rare disorder, EB, led to being teased and bullied throughout school. I kept notebooks filled with all of the thoughts I wanted to say to those bullies, but never could. Somewhere along life’s journey this simple escape morphed into a passion that morphed into a career choice. Where my lips fail, my pen excels. When I’m not sitting at the kitchen table, music blaring, sipping on coffee, typing away…I love creating endless memories with my family and friends, hitting the beach and cooking up a storm in the kitchen. I’m a movie buff, music maniac, coffee addict and an adorable concoction of sarcasm and wit. 

Want to know more about Derra?

Follow Derra on social media/website:

Website/ Social Media: Blog: www.genuinleyderra.com                                     Twitter handle: @derra_nic                                     Instagram handle: @derra_nic 

Want to read by Derra?

Dear You (available paperback, Kindle, Kindle Unlimited, soon to be on Audible)                                       Anomaly (available paperback, Kindle, Kindle Unlimited, Audible)

Interview:

1) What genre/s do you write in? And why?

The genre I write in is Noon-Fiction/ Short Stories. I chose this genre because I began writing about events in my life, personal situations, in hopes of helping those going through similar situations. The short stories I write are personal moments/ dreams/ nightmares, but with a creative twist.


2) Tell me about your WIP.

My current wip (which should be in book form for sale by the end of the year) is about the twisted dreams and nightmares I’ve had since my childhood. Imagine falling down the rabbit hole and ending up in a place that looks like Wonderland, Halloweentown and a Hitchcock film all in one. with a few creepy back alleys intertwined within the shadows of course. 

3) What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? 


My writing process is simple as I am a creature of habit. Usually I begin writing after breakfast and continue through until lunch. My place is choice is the kitchen table (close access to the fridge), grab an iced coffee, choose a playlist (currently it’s a mix of Blink 182 and NF) and begin. I leave the afternoons for cleaning, errands and appointments. There are times when I’ll write at night and even on my phone, need to get those thoughts out when they pop up. I write everyday, except weekends. 


4) What do you think makes a good story or poem?

Honestly, I think that genuine characters (whether they’re good or evil) and a story plot that is attention grabbing is what makes for a great story. 

5) If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why?

One piece of advice I would give my past self is…Don’t write a book based off of what’s trending or what you think will please the critics. Write what you know because writing what you know will always make an awesome book. That book will grab the attention of book lovers. Critics are everywhere, you will never create a story that 100% of society will love. Also, don’t let any negative comment or review get you down, those comments are just a part of this whole writing gig.


6) What’s your day job?

My day job is writing and blogging, I have decided to may this my career. So, petal to the metal.

7)Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? 

My hobbies and passions: I really enjoy cooking, it is my de-stresser from the day, plus I love cooking a meal for my family and friends. I love staying in on a rainy day and watching movies or going out on a beautiful sunny day to hit the beach. I love to travel, go to museums and I especially love going to concerts. I am the introvert that desperately wants to be an extrovert.


8) What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

This is a tough question… So, last year Elevation from Stephen King came out and it got quite a bit of mixed reviews. First off, Elevation is a 146 page novel, not your typical 500 page brick of a book that King is known for, which already had some fans upset. Second, Elevation isn’t a horror story about an Outsider murdering a young boy or of a creepy-ass clown luring kids into the underground sewers, this story is more bend your mind not your stomach. It is a book that makes you think way past the barriers of your mind. I thoroughly enjoyed Elevation, I think it’s cool when an author hits you with a new style twist out of the blue. 

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w


Author Spotlight: Nicole Scarano

Neece Editorial would like to present Nicole Scarano, our Wednesday Author Spotlight!

Who is Nicole Scarano?

Nicole Scarano is an avid Audible listener, book reader, and TV lover and therefore loves the art of storytelling.  She is the author of “Pomegranate” which follows Hades rise from mortal woman to god of the underworld.  By day she is a video editor and dog walker, and in her spare time she is working on two novels, a novella, and any other short story that comes to mind while her rescued pitbull, China, keeps her company.

Want to know more about Nicole?

Follow her on social media:

Twitter @nicolerscarano

Instagram @nicolereneescarano

Facebook @NicoleScaranoAuthor

Want to read by Nicole?

Novel:

http://mybook.to/Pomegranate

Short Stories:

https://www.writer-writer.com/blog/1st-runner-up-of-our-fantasy-competition-phoenix-rising-the-body-of-water-between-us-by-n-s

https://www.writer-writer.com/blog/runner-up-of-our-sf-f-competition-the-alpha-initiative-by-nicole-scarano

Interview:

What genre/s do you write in? And why?

I write mostly fantasy, dystopian, and sci-fi with romance usually mixed in, although my favorite thing to do is genre blend. I like having a fantasy story set in a science fiction world (my next planned series), or a fantasy set in a dystopian future. My short story linked above “The Body Of Water Between Us” is a dystopian fantasy and it came in first runner-up in Writer Writer’s fantasy contest. Eventually I would love to turn it into a full-length novel. As far as why I write these genres, part of it is these are what I love. I do also love thrillers, but my brain doesn’t work that way. Although when I create a story, I never set out to write a certain genre. I just create a plot I love (usually with a lot of action and plot twists) and then figure it out from there.

Tell me about your WIP.

My current WIP is Pomegranate’s sequel. It picks up about a year after the first one, and I am looking to have it published by fall/early winter of this year. I am excited about it because I wrote Pomegranate 8 years ago, and my writing has come a long way since then. I am also working on a standalone YA dystopian, but I am only in the beginning stages of its first draft. Lastly, I am editing a romance novella that I wrote last summer with the intentions of self-publishing

What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why?

Probably Neal Shusterman. All of his books are amazing and yet terrifying, and I love it. Especially Thunderhead. I would love to get advice from him.

What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? 

I always start with an outline. I am a plotter all the way. Tried to pants my way through Pomegranate 8 years ago when I first started, and it went in a direction I hated. So now I plot everything, even short stories. I work full time and dog walk for a few clients every week so writing every day is almost impossible. Occasionally I write at work on my lunch breaks on my phone or on paper (I will print out my wip to edit). Mostly I write on the weekends. Sundays are my ‘don’t bother me I am writing’ days. I do not go out or see people. I stay home and work. In the winter I write on my couch and in the summer outside in my yard sun tanning. I have to write my first drafts with film scores and usually alone (because I talk to myself and it gets weird with an audience), but when I edit, I can either listen to music or watch TV and can be around people… as long as they don’t bother me.

What do you think makes a good story or poem?

Plot, realism, to quote Inception, one simple idea. While great characters are important, to me plot makes the story. There is nothing better than a well-crafted and interesting plot. Secondly realism. I don’t mean realistic as in obeying nature’s laws, but realistic as in genuine. I can suspend my belief and trust that dragons, magic, aliens, or monsters are real, but when the characters feel fake or the scenarios trivial, the book looses the reader. Interactions, problems, and personalities have to feel authentic. And lastly one simple idea. The best stories, while complex, are at their core based on one idea. For example Game of Thrones is about families warring for one throne. So much happens in these books/show, and there are so many characters, but essentially it is about people clamoring for power. Too often plots try to accomplish too many things, and they are never as strong.  Keep the core simple and then build from there.

If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why?

Get a proofreader! Trust me it is no fun finding out later there are mistakes and having to pull the book and re-edit.

What’s your day job?

Video editor and part-time dog walker

Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? 

Um…. Does TV count? And my dog? I really love my dog, but don’t have many hobbies. I do like the occasionally video game. Right before I wrote this I was playing the new God Of War… or should I say, I was dying in God Of War. Man, it’s hard,

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Just two. Pomegranates sequel is in the works and almost done. Woohoo! I also have a YA standalone that is in its first draft. As for book ideas… do you have 8 years for me to list them?

Do you believe in writer’s block?

No, I do not. Maybe because I never start a project until the idea is fully formed in my mind. I usually let things simmer in my brain until the story is completely fleshed out. This can take a while. I just came up with the middle/end for the third and final book in my series, but have had the basic plot for years. I will say that some days are easier to write than others, and it shows when I edit. Way more to fix than some of the other sections.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

Yes I do, but only on Amazon. I love the good ones and lets just say those bad ones sting. The ones that are constructive can strengthen you, and of course there are those that hurt. It is definitely teaching me to have tougher skin. Sometimes seeing the non-constructive reviews can really give you self-doubt. You can’t have self-doubt when you are an author, and I am too busy moving onwards to let myself be sidetracked by negativity.

Are you a plotter or a pantser?

I answered the one before. Hardcore Plotter. I go days without writing and so having an outline mapping the book out is helpful in me keep track of where the story is going, what has happened, and avoiding plot holes.

What author/books are you currently reading?

Lots. I can never read just one at a time, although I’ll only mention two for now. I am listening to Super Powereds Year 4 by Drew Hayes on audible. All 60 hours of it. And I am reading The Dead Lands by Dylan J. Morgan. I highly recommend both.

As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing?

That it was good. I want people to walk away from my books impacted by how much they enjoyed it, even if they get nothing deeper from it. I want them to love it. I just finished Stranger Things Season 3 and feel sad watching other shows because Stranger Things was just that good. I want to forget this season and watch it again. I would love my readers to feel even a fraction of that. And if they get a deeper meaning from reading it, that is even better.

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Author Spotlight: Sandy Day

Neece Editorial is proud to present Sandy Day as our Monday author spotlight.

Who is Sandy Day?

Sandy Day lives in Georgina, Ontario. She is the author of Fred’s Funeral, Chatterbox Poems, and An Empty Nest. She holds a degree in English Literature from Glendon College in Toronto, where her professors included great Canadian writers, Michael Ondaatje and bp Nichol. Sandy is a writing facilitator, trained in the AWA method, for the Toronto Writers Collective’s creative writing workshops.  She sells dog halters on the side.

Want to know more about Sandy?

Follow her on social media and on her website:

www.sandyday.ca

Twitter: @sandeetweets
Instagram: @sandeesnaps

Want to know where to find more of Sandy’s work?

Books:

Interview:

1. What genre/s do you write in? And why?

I write literary fiction because that’s what I like to read. My favourite writer is Alice Munro. I love slice of life fiction, and memoir, and the intersection of the two. I like stories of all kinds but I only finish reading them if they’re written with fresh and original language. I like depth of meaning and layers in the books I read. I like chicklit that makes me laugh, and love stories that make me yearn, but the stories, characters, and structure have to be well crafted. I strive for that in my own work.

2. Tell me about your WIP. 

I am currently planning a domestic thriller, of sorts: A slightlyinsane and post-menopausal woman suspects that her brother has killed his wife. I know it will turn out with my own peculiar tone and message, but I’m trying to write within the conventions of the genre. This is a first for me. I don’t usually plan a book this way.

At the same time, I’m editing a novel with the working title, White Feather. I’ve been writing it for many years. Its so satisfying to work on something that’s already written.

3. What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why?

I would have dinner with Sylvia Plath. I would love to talk to her about her writing and her life. I’d tell her how much she influenced me as a girl and how much I admire her. I wish we could go back in time and make life tolerable for her so that she wouldn’t have had to kill herself. She was colossal talent (pun intended). Imagine the work she might have written. I’d love to have met her.

4. What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? 

I write in the cracks and corners of my life. I’ve written forever so my process changes and evolves as I dobut I’ve always liked to write on my lap, not at a desk. Now that I’m older and have time, I tend to write more. Lately I’ve been writing morning pages – and that’s a strategy I’m going to use to write my thriller. I write and rewrite as I go. I assemble my books, like patchwork quilts, layer upon layer of steps — selecting colours and textures, pacing and spacing, choosing moods, piecing, cutting whole scenes, stitching the layers together, embellishing — I go over and over my books until I cannot stand them one more minute. Then I hand them over to my favourite reader, my sister, Nancy.

5. What do you think makes a good story or poem?

Originality. A piece of writing is an expression of a universal experience told with specific and unique language. When a piece is good, it hits us in the guts, or funny bone. It’s surprising but safe. It rings true and familiar, but it’s expressed in a fresh and fascinating way. It makes us feel something.

6. If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why?

Don’t stop! I stopped writing after university because I got involved in earning a living. I believed what people told me, you can’t make a living by writing. I wish I’d written a journal at least through those years.

7. What’s your day job?

My day job is indie-author-publisher. But I do freelance work to pay the bills. I’m a social media marketer for a few organizations and individuals, and I do a small amount of editing. My main source of income comes from a small veterinary practice in Toronto — I do their bookkeeping and I market a dog product that one of vets invented.

8. Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? 

I’m fascinated by nutrition — lately I’m a keto advocate. I never tire of learning about what humans eat.

I’m completely addicted to American politics and cannot wait for this nightmare administration to be over with so I can break my Twitter habit. 

I try not to get distracted by other activities, other than having lunch, because they just take away time from writing.

9. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toewes. I know it drew acclaim when it was first publishedbut I don’t hear people talk about it anymore. It’s one of the best coming of age stories ever written. Another one is The Pied Piper by Nevil Shute. So good, and so pertinent to today.

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Unpublished? One: White Feather, and I’m editing it now.

Half-finished? Ha! Several. I hope to get to them all someday.

11. Do you believe in writer’s block?

Writer’s block is resistance. It’s a boogeyman. My writing instructor in university, bp Nichol, used to say to me — write what you can’t stop thinking about. Well, at the time, I wasn’t allowing myself to write about what I couldn’t stop thinking (an old love affair) so I just didn’t write. My stuff was obtuse and I was always trying to hide the real meaning. Nothing opens up writing like permission to write about anything and everything. My latest novel, White Feather, concerns this very thing.

12. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

Ive been fortunate to have received glowing reviews from book bloggers around the world. I’ve had reviews from these strangers that have made me burst into tears because they seem to understand me better that I do myself. Ive received bad reviews too, usually from people who bought the book expecting something else. Readers complain my books are too short — I believe that’s a compliment.

13. Are you a plotter or a pantser?

I have no idea what a plot is. I read a million books about craft and structure, listen to a zillion podcasts, and I still can’t figure out how a plot works. I just write about a particular time and place, knowing generally, what’s going to happen. With my domestic thriller, I’m trying to outline in more detail to keep me on track with the writing process. 

14. What author/books are you currently reading?

I’m reading The Anatomy of Story by John Truby. It’s amazing. Every writer should read it. I wish I’d read it in 2007 when it was published. 

For fiction, I’m reading Hotel Paradise by Martha Grimes. I loves me an unreliable narrator.

15. As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing?

I want people to remember me as an honest to the bone writer like Alice Munro. I want people to feel somewhat uncomfortable when they’re reading my stuff  like it’s getting a too close to some secret they’ve been keeping. That’s how I’d like to be remembered.

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Author Spotlight: Gideon Marcus

Neece Editorial had the honor of an interview with the award-winning Gideon Marcus.

Who is Gideon Marcus?

Gideon Marcus is an award-winning SF author, editor, and space historian: his web project, Galactic Journey, won the Serling in 2016 and was/is a finalist for the Hugo in 2018 and 2019. His short story, Andy and Tina, was published last August, the lead story in Inklings Press’ Tales from Alternate Earths 2 and a candidate for the Sidewise Award. Rediscovery: SF by Women (1958 – 1963), edited, curated, and with an introductory essay written by Gideon, will be published in July by Journey Press, the small publisher he founded.

A sought-after public speaker and educator, he resides in Vista, CA with his author wife of twenty years, their polymath teenage daughter, and two excellent gopher-slayers, Anthy and Minty.  

Want to know more about Gideon?

Follow him on social media and on his websites:

Galactic Journey

Journey Press

Twitter: @journeygalactic

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/galacticjourney/

Want to know where to find Gideon’s work?

“Pioneering Space” Four-part space history series in Quest: Space Quarterly (2006-2008)

Hundreds of articles for the Coast News (2007-2009)

Andy and Tina, Tales from Alternate Earths 2, Inklings Press (2018)

Rediscovery: SF by Women (1958-1963) (2019)

Galactic Journey (2013-2019)

Assorted book reviews for Space Times, Hadassah, etc. (2007-2019)

Interview:

What genre/s do you write in? And why?

When I was five, my primary interests were space and dinosaurs.  That pretty much guaranteed that I would end up in science fiction, though I’ve also done a lot of fantasy (of which genre SF is a subgenre).  Working in SFF allows me to build unique worlds, to dream big, while still incorporating elements universal to all writing: good characters, dynamic plots, and, often, a big helping of romance.

Tell me about your WIP. 

I am 20% into Sirena, the second book in the Kitra series.  Book 1 introduced nineteen-year-old Kitra Yilmaz , who dreams of traveling the galaxy like her Ambassador mother. Her glider is the closest she can get to touching the stars — until she stakes her entire inheritance on a salvage Navy spaceship found surprisingly cheap at auction. But the stars end up closer than she expects when her ship plunges suddenly into hyperspace on its shakedown cruise. Now trapped ten light years from home, all Kitra and her four crewmates have is smarts, hope, and each other… and maybe just a little bit of luck, to get them back.

Kitra features a queer female protagonist and a diverse cast of characters and is essentially Lost in Space meets The Martian, pitting the resources of talented but overwhelmed young adults against the dangers of the universe.

Sirena and subsequent books in the series are in the same vein — I’m not big on villains.  I think the universe as a whole, and the unintended consequences of our actions make for interesting drama in and of themselves!

What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why?

Rosel George Brown.  She made a splash in the SF of the 50s and 60s before dying way too young in 1966.  She’s largely forgotten now, like so many authors from that era (particularly the women).  I’d love to know more about her. Maybe bring her modern medicines…

What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? 

Galactic Journey takes a lot of time composing articles and editing those of fellow staff.  Running Journey Press also takes time. But when I have a fiction project I’m working on, I set daily word counts — 500 for short pieces and 1000 for novels.  It’s easier to get more out when working on a book since I’m generally working on one scene. Short stories require more deliberate and dense crafting. I write every work day, weekends and holidays excluded.  Like a regular job.

I prefer to write on a ten-year old ASUS laptop, and generally upstairs in my room, with my wife doing her writing downstairs in the joint office.  I like the laptop since it has a smaller keyboard and is easier for me to type on before my carpal tunnel/tendonitis flares up. I can also take it anywhere, and I’ve sometimes written in coffee shops and diners.  

What do you think makes a good story or poem?

Practice. 🙂  And conciseness.

If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why?

Get wrist braces and an ergonomic setup early.  You can seriously hurt your hands doing this job.

Other than that, you can’t teach yourself expertise.  You can only write and write. Also, read a lot. That’s the blueprint for writing well — follow good examples and practice a lot.

What’s your day job?

The very fact that this is a standard question bothers me, because it means that writers can’t make a living writing.  And, in fact, I have met lots of writers, some quite successful by any metric — and they still have to have day jobs.  

Moreover, agents and publishers don’t need “day jobs” — representing and publishing are their day jobs.  Apparently they can afford to live off of the work of creators, but the creators themselves cannot.  This suggests that they make too much off the backs of their clients.  

Independent publishing used to be a dirty phrase.  These days, I think it’s the way to go.

I’m lucky.  I used to be a corporate executive, turning around and/or revitalizing struggling companies.  I retired last year after a particularly successful position. So, I can afford to take my time and embark on projects that are not immediately profitable.  Most people don’t have that luxury. Writers shouldn’t have to be like the scientist dilettantes of the 18th Century, nobles with the resources and time to spend on valuable research that could not otherwise be done.

Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? 

I’m on the Board of Directors of a county-wide nonprofit that provides rides for seniors and disabled people.  But for the most part, I just like being a dad and a spouse, working with my wonderful family on our projects. We go to Japan every year (my spouse is a frequent-flier-mile wizard) and we’re all more or less fluent in the language.  

I love presenting at museums, conventions, restaurants, libraries, comic shops.. you name it.  Talking about history and technology lets me have all the fun of being a professor without any of the headaches.

We’re a musical family, and I always enjoy the chance to sing.  I am a terrible dancer, though. Thankfully, the rest of my family is good at it!

What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

Cordwainer Smith is one of the best authors most people have never heard of.  His Instrumentality series, culminating in The Boy Who Bought Old Earth and The Store of Heart’s Desire, two halves of a book.

I also recommend Zenna Henderson’s Pilgrimage and Rosel George Brown/Keith Laumer’s Earthblood.

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I co-wrote a fantasy with my brother, What is a Demon? more than two decades ago.  It’s actually pretty good and I might someday revisit it.  I’ve just finalized Kitra, and that will probably see press next year, depending on how my other Journey Press projects work.  I had started the standard query process for it, but I quickly determined that I was unlikely to find an agent or publisher I’d enjoy working with (or who would leave me a reasonable share of rights to the book/percentage of sales).

Do you believe in writer’s block?

No.  If you clear your mind and noodle a bit, a good idea will come.  

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I do read them.  I am delighted with the good ones, chagrined by the bad ones.  On the other hand, I’ve now gotten sufficiently good at my writing that a bad review is usually the result of a mismatch of taste rather than my really dropping the ball.

Are you a plotter or a pantser?

I make plot skeletons and fill in with pants.  Actually, I often write scenes in my head such that, when I get to the keyboard, it’s simply a transfer rather than a creation process.

What author/books are you currently reading?

If it came out 55 years ago, I read it.  All of it. Then I tell you what is worth reading.

You’re welcome… 🙂

As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing?

That I wrote interesting, entertaining stories…consistently!

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Author Spotlight: Raquel Graffen

Neece Editorial is pleased to present Raquel Graffen. Her book “Nothing Done In Love” is Free on Amazon from July 18-20th. Head over and grab a copy!

Who is Raquel Graffen?

Raquel Graffen is the nom de plume used by writer Tara Neale for her racier literary erotica. Raquel is the no-holds-barred author of a broad range of fiction, from novels to short stories. 

Her characters are REAL, not size zero 20-somethings or billionaire playboys. Even her millionaires, Marines, shapeshifters, and SEALs bear scars: seen and unseen. And those are just the beginning of their complex, REAL life problems like grief, mental health, and body issues. Her stories are as dark and twisted as life itself, but always with a happy ending, whether for now or ever after.

After a lifetime of trials, tribulations, and struggles, Raquel is living the dream. Not only is she a writer, but also a 1950’s style homemaker, caring for her partner and daughter. Her day is long, beginning before dawn with writing under the watchful eye of their cat, Little Miss Fluffy Paws. The rest of the day is filled with cooking, cleaning, sewing, and a myriad of other Madonna tasks about which she blogs. Evenings once again find her at the computer handling the business side of things and stays in touch with readers via Twitter. The day ends as it began…in the arms of her dream man. Theirs is the one story that if she did write, no one would actually believe because it is simply too good to be true.

Want to know more about Raquel?

Follow her on social media and her website:

Website: http://www.raquelgraffen.uk/

Twitter: @raquelgraffen

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/19176153.Raquel_Graffen

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Raquel-Graffen/e/B07RV8XYLQ?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2&qid=1562775772&sr=1-2

Want to read Raquel’s work?

Nothing Done In Love

Solid Ground

Interview:

  1. What genre/s do you write in? And why? – That has always been my biggest problem. I don’t fit in a neat little box, and neither do my books. I spoil my erotic romance with heavy themes like death, PTSD, and body image. But my books have way too much sex in them to be classified as literary fiction. I call them literary erotica. Unfortunately, Amazon does not have that category. 
  2. Tell me about your WIP. – I am currently editing my popular polyandry, BDSM series. It is the story of three Norwegian fishermen who in keeping with ancient tradition ‘capture’ their bride. Don’t be fooled; it is anything except non-consent. The heroine may be reluctant to accept her Fate, but aren’t we all?
  3. What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why? – Virginia Woolf. I read her classic A Room of One’s Own, an essay about women and fiction. I would love to have her time travel, spend the day introducing her to ebooks, self-publishing, and 21st-century women’s literature. I could pump her for hours on what she thought of ‘progress.’ Did she believe her predictions were accurate?
  4. What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? I am a member of the #5amwritingclub, or I try to be. I am the only morning person in our @HomeCrazzyHome. So, I do my best to get up every morning at 5 a.m. Over a cup or three or five of hot black coffee with plenty of sugar, I check emails, tweet, and get down to the business of writing and editing. I get my whole day in by the time my partner and daughter begin to wake up around 10 or so. I had a lovely office, but my daughter’s guinea pigs took that over. So, now I write on my laptop in the family room. As big as our house is, I don’t have a single room of my own. I can imagine what Virginia Woolf would say to that one.
  5. What do you think makes a good story or poem? – Theme. I have read many stories with great plots, life-like characters, and technically proficient writing. Those are four stars for me. What sets a story or poem apart for me, what makes it truly exceptional is one thing: does it grow me as a person. I love stories where the character’s growth inspires your own. 
  6. If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why? – Get used to the business side of things. I still hate it. Now, I find myself trying to make up lost time. I wrote for years on a free website, but I never collected emails. That was a colossal mistake. Now I am scrambling to build a newsletter list that was once just there.
  7. What’s your day job? – I have the best job in the whole world. I am a homemaker. Not a housewife, no one ever married a house. Nor a stay-at-home mom, I have never met a mother who got to stay at home for long. I love the old-fashioned term: homemaker. That describes perfectly what I do. He provides a house, a roof over our heads. I turn that into a home with love, food, and crafts.
  8. Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? – Sewing especially making clothes for my ever-growing doll collection. Reading, but what writer isn’t a reader. And my latest is photography. I spent so much time and effort trying to find photographs for my blog when I knew exactly what I wanted. So, I asked for a decent camera for my birthday. My logos are made from photographs that I took in our garden. 
  9. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel? – Autism Goes To Schoolby Dr. Sharon Mitchell. It combines two of my passions – romance and autism. As the neurodivergent mother of an #ActuallyAutistic teen daughter, that book is the most accurate and positive portrayal of life on the spectrum that I have ever read. It is the book that I would have any parent with a child who was newly diagnosed read first. 
  10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have? Over fifty. Yes, I said over fifty. I don’t want to know the exact number. Of those, at least a dozen, maybe two are worth finishing and publishing. I am working on it. But I feel it would take a couple of lifetimes to do them all justice.
  11. Do you believe in writer’s block? – Oh, yes. You mean some writers don’t? I am just emerging from a three-year-long block. This may seem strange, but my life was too perfect. Yes, too perfect. I have always written about finding redemption in love. But when you finally have that, when you are living it, you realize how completely inadequate words are to describe the reality. I still feel that way, but I have to try at least. 
  12. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones? – Yes – every one. I would like to say something about not letting them get to me or finding the kernel of truth of them, but I am too human and fallible for that. Like many sensitive writers, I can never believe the good stuff but always do the bad. 
  13. Are you a plotter or a pantser? – What is this thing you call plotting? Total and complete pantser. I don’t even have control over my characters. They just run around in my head, telling me their stories, and demanding that I take dictation. My control comes only in the editing process. 
  14. What author/books are you currently reading? Nancy Lee Badgers Warriors in Bronze series. And Saving Jasonby Kate Anslinger. I am looking for a steaming hot one. Any suggestions? 
  15. As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing? – That is easy. My Three Rules of Life which are the central themes of everything I write. 1) Life sucks. 2) Love is the only thing that makes it worth living. And 3) Great sex is the best way to show that love. 

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Author Spotlight: Tabatha Shipley

Neece Editorial is happy to announce kind and generous Tabatha Shipley as our spotlight author this Wednesday.

Who is Tabatha Shipley?

Tabatha is the author of the Kingdom of Fraun series, Projection, and 30 Days Without Wings. She lives with her awesome husband, energetic kids, and goofy dog in Arizona. In her free time, she enjoys baking and reading, but not at the same time because that would be weird. She believes strongly in the power of helping others and is always willing to help out a fellow reader or writer. 

Want to know more about Tabatha Shipley?

Follow her on social media and on her website

Website- https://tabathashipleybooks.com/

Social media handles-

Facebook @AuthorTabathaShipley

Twitter @ShipleyTabatha

Instagram @authortabathashipley

Want to read Tabatha’s work?

List of Published Works:

Interview:

What genre/s do you write in? And why?

I always tend to write in young adult because I’m focused on writing the stories I wanted or needed as a teenager. I often escaped to other worlds through my books at that age. For that reason, I also tend to write in fantasy and science fiction. Creating worlds for teenagers to escape to is totally my brand.

Tell me about your WIP. 

I’m actively editing two different works right now. The first one is the (highly anticipated) third book in the Kingdom of Fraun series. It follows one of my favorite characters and their part of the story. The second one is a magical young adult fantasy story about two strong girls competing for one job at a school for magic users. It’s currently simmering on the burner as I consider adding a third strong girl storyline into the mix.

What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why?

That’s always such a hard question! One one hand I’ve love to have a dinner with someone like JK Rowling but I imagine I’d just spend my time fangirling about Harry Potter and not really get any genuine conversation about life as a writer or work-life balance out of that. So instead I’d choose Tom Leveen. He’s more down-to-earth and I feel like I’d be able to really pick his brain…after I stopped fangirling over his books.

What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? 

Typically, I write at home on my desktop computer with music that fits the mood of the scene playing. However, if I get stuck or need a change of pace I’ll work at a coffee shop not far from my house with the laptop. I try to write five days a week and give myself two days to rest. On those five days a week I tend to do two writing sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. I’m oddly more productive during the morning session, however.

What do you think makes a good story or poem?

Emotion. Readers want to be able to connect something they’ve felt with what’s happening in your story. Writers who can bring that emotion to the surface for everyone are the best writers, in my opinion.

If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why?

Keep writing. There are going to be days when it’s difficult. There are going to be days when you doubt that what you are writing is any good. Keep writing anyway. 

What’s your day job?

I am a certified teacher and a middle school math content specialist. But, for now, I’m writing full time and substitute teaching during the school year occasionally. 

Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? 

Reading, puzzles, baking, and hockey. 

What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

Mercy Rule by Tom Leveen.

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I recently looked this up for an AuthorTube video, actually. I have 14 novels in various forms of progress from barely started to outline all the way to finished a draft and shelved it because something isn’t feeling right with it. I remind myself of this number anytime my imposter syndrome has me worrying that I don’t have enough ideas to keep myself writing full time.

Do you believe in writer’s block?

I believe in idea block. That’s probably why I have so many active works-in-progress. If one idea falls flat for me, I just flip to another idea. I’m always writing.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I do tend to read them. As an indie author, I feel like I need to be proactive and share reviews out to help me with marketing because no one else is going to do that for me. I try not to take the negative ones to heart, although I am an irrational perfectionist. You absolutely can’t please everyone. Search your favorite book, there are bound to be scathing one-star reviews attached to it. No one is perfect. That being said, there have been a few four or five-star reviews that made me want to cry because they were so beautiful. They represent people who connected with your book in a real way and that is the best feeling in the world.

Are you a plotter or a pantser?

I am a plotter. I take my story ideas straight into a detailed outline before I write the first draft. That statement should go with an asterisk next to it though because I believe all plotters pants their outlines. I’m also not so tied to my outline that I will resist changing it mid-draft. Some of my best plot twists have been ideas that weren’t on the outline originally.

What author/books are you currently reading?

I’m currently reading Long Grows the Dark by Catherine Labadie. I’m almost done with it though so depending on when this interview goes live that may change. I read about 10 books every month, so it changes a lot. You can keep up with my crazy reading habits by following me on Goodreads (goodreads.com/tabathashipley) or by watching my monthly wrap up videos on my YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmKCHSW24yuk9HTm6vZA1eg).

As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing?

I guess just that books can change your world and I’m here for that, both as a reader and a writer. I love hearing when a book made you think, feel, or change. Find me on whatever social media platform you like best to make a new bookish friend and shout about all your favorite books with me. 

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Author Spotlight: Christine Brooks

Neece Editorial is pleased to present the lovely Christine Brooks. She actively publishes poetry and creative nonfiction.

Who is Christine Brooks?

Christine A. Brooks is a graduate of Western New England University with her B.A. in Literature, and is currently attending Bay Path University for her M.F.A. in Creative Nonfiction, graduating May 2019. A series of poems, The Ugly Five, are in the summer issue of Door Is A Jar Magazine and her poem, The Writer, is in the June, 2018 issue of The Cabinet of Heed Literary Magazine. Three poems, Puff, Sisterand Grapesare in the 5thissue of The Mystic Blue Review. ​Her vignette, Finding God, is in in the December issue of Riggwelter Press, and her series of vignettes, Small Packages,was named a semifinalist at Gazing Grain Press in August 2018. Her poem, The Monarch,is published in the October 2018 issue and The Manis published in November 2018 issue of the Amethyst Review. Her poem, White Light will appear in the April 2019 issue of The Cabinet of Heed.

Want to know more about Christine Brooks?

Follow her on social media and view published works on her website:

Website-www.christinebrooks.writer.com

Twitter- @OMG_its_CBrooks 

Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/ChrisBrooksauthor/

Interview:

1. What genre/s do you write in? And why?

I write memoir and poetry but have written a fiction book as well. For the most part, I listen to my inner muse and go where it tells me to go, sounds a bit weird saying that out loud but that is how it has worked for the last five years or so.

Two years ago, I learned that Emily Dickinson was a distant cousin so my professors at Bay Path University encouraged me to try writing poetry. After finishing my thesis, it feels like a relief to write short poems which are mostly unstructured free verse.

2. Tell me about your WIP. 

My WIP is my memoir titled, Letters to M. I started doing biological research for my thesis and when I found out about Emily I started journaling to her.  I thought it was just for fun at first and didn’t realize those letters would become the basis of my thesis and WIP.

As my research went deeper the M’s changed from Emily, to my mother Mary, to my imaginary friend growing up, the Man in the Moon, to my biological Mother and eventually to me.  

3. What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why?

I would have loved to have dinner with Ernest Hemingway. I’m not sure we would get along but for me he represents a time in America that existed, seemingly, just for him to write about. His writing about the war and his time in Cuba are fascinating and I wonder had he been born 50 years later if he would have ever been a writer….I would like to ask him that.

4. What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? 

My process is downright bizarre and although I have discussed it before it always leads to blank faces and wild stares. Given how it happens, I understand why. I write very late at night (almost every night) on the notes section of my iphone. I wrote an entire novel, Tambo Man(55k words) that way. I type what comes to me and when I am done I copy and paste it to my email and then revisit it in the morning and put it in my Word document to proofread.

Strange, right?

5. What do you think makes a good story or poem?

For me relevance is the key! If I can relate to an essay/poem/story on some level I am instantly hooked! Great writing never hurts either.

In poetry, I like new forms and fun quirky ideas, using an & or — also make me smile.

6. If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why?

Just write! I often sat and thought and thought and thought about how to write something or if anyone would want to read it.  Now I write everything that comes to mind.  Some of it, a lot of it, is garbage but it goes in a folder titled “Garbage for later” that I revisit for ideas during dry spells.

7. What’s your day job?

I currently work in local government but am looking to move to a field more closely related to my MFA.

8. Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? 

I am passionate about the ocean and spend my free time in search of the perfect break (small wave ambassador) and quiet place in the sun.

9. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

My favorite under-appreciated novel is “Blood Strangers: A Memoir: Katherine A Briccetti.” I am interested in adoption and those that have either been adopted or adopted children, and I think this novel covers a wonderful wide range of that topic and many others that are just fabulous.

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

I have one completed fictional novel that is unpublished and my WIP is about 75%.

11. Do you believe in writer’s block?

Not believing in writer’s block is like not believing in a serious muscle strain! I have been quite fortunate to not suffer from it too much, but I have friends that deal with it almost daily! 

12. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I sometimes read reviews when looking to buy a book, and I have been guilty of reading my own for essays but it can be rough. The bad ones stay with me for days if not weeks, so I try to skip them. I wrote an essay recently for HuffPost that got shared my MSN and I got vilified for being everything from fat, to ugly, to undate-able and worse. Thankfully no one (at least no one I read) thought my writing was bad! I know it comes with the territory but people can be cruel and they forget we are still human and being called hideous still hurts.

13. Are you a plotter or a pantser?

I’m not sure I know what this means, lol. I think you mean do I like a surprise ending or do I build suspense. If that’s accurate then I am a pantser, 100%! 

14. What author/books are you currently reading?

I am currently reading “A Drinking Life” by Pete Hamill and LOVING it!

15. As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing?

What I would hope people remember about both me and my writing is that I write my truth.  It may not always be pretty, or flashy, or even published but I can promise that it is honest and something I believe relevant to others. Sometimes even what we think is not great writing covers topics that reach folks and help them by simply just being there and I think that is the most important thing we as writers can ever do.

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Author Spotlight: Maggie Cannon

Neece Editorial is pleased to present Maggie Cannon, our Friday Author Spotlight. She is currently querying her first novel (The Traveling Way) and writing the sequel to it.

Who is Maggie Cannon?

Let’s hear it from her:

Living on a farm and raising two busy kids, my life is hectic. I needed to find something I could do in the car, the stands, the parking lot… something I could take with me. I crochet, sew, and watch Netflix, but a friend said I should try writing because I’m a great storyteller.

Well, when I was a student, I was told that I “didn’t have the ideas for writing” and those words stayed with me for a long time. I was so hesitant to try, until that friend asked me where the person that said that was. “If they aren’t here, why do you care what they said?”

Now, as a Middle School teacher, I have shared my love of reading with hundreds of children, and writing has become one more tool for me to use to encourage students to read. I’m excited to put my book into the hands of children.

Once I got others out of my way, my first book FLEW out of me and the second is hot on its heels. My social media goal is to show everyone that anyone can, and should try writing. There are so many amazing prompts and tools available that nothing should get in your way.

Want to know more about Maggie Cannon?

Follow her on social media:

Interview:

What genre/s do you write in? And why? 

I am a young adult author, focusing on the middle grades.

The Traveling Way is a mixture of realistic fiction and historical fiction, but because of the time traveling aspect, it falls into science fiction.

I think I am drawn to this age because I have a middle school daughter, a freshman son, and I teach middle school. It’s such a dynamic age filled with ups and downs. It’s easy to get swept up in the emotion because everyone is intensified. They care so much about everything.

I wonder if I’ll write about nursing home life when I get there… 

Tell me about your WIP. 

My WIP is a sequel to my first book, The Traveling Way. 

Just as Abraham Walsh begins to feel confident in the time traveling ability he inherited, new talents emerge, and he and his friends are once again thrown into danger. 

When a body shows up at the museum, the four friends must help find out who is responsible and stop them before they can execute their deadly plan. Will this foursome be able to work together, control their new abilities, save the travelers, and their way of life? 

What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why?

Ugh, this is so hard. 

I’d love to sit with Theodora Goss because I’d want to pick her brain about plotting. How does she weave it altogether? She’s amazing.

I’d love to eat with Jenny Lawson because we could be in pajamas on the couch, and she’s fricken hilarious! I might even get to see Beyoncé the Chicken.

Stephen King because his books are so immersive. How does he describe a scene so well?

But most probably James Patterson. He has done such an amazing job of writing for adults, middle grades and everyone in between… how does he switch from horror to clean middle school…he seems to do it seamlessly.

What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? 

I created a portable desk that I use in my living room because, while I love being with my family, to be honest, I have the most comfortable couch! Also, my dog loves to supervise me and this way he can be right with me at all times. 

While most people listen to music, my writing soundtrack is Netflix serial killer and murderer documentaries. I also wrote to Schitt’s Creek and The IT Crowd!

I try to write every day. I find it makes me a more consistent writer and it makes it easier. My goal is 1,000 words a day. 

I have recently found that I am a “one project at a time” girl. No breaks or multiple projects for me! It becomes a crossover disaster!

What do you think makes a good story or poem?

Including the feelings and emotions that everyone understands is an extremely important part of a piece of good writing. I need to be able to connect with the thoughts and feelings of the voice and, once do that, I’m hooked.

If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why?

Ignore the haters and do what you enjoy! No one should be able to tell you what you are good at. Don’t let people live in your head rent free.

What’s your day job?

I’m a middle school teacher that works with at-risk and alternative education students. I love helping them see the potential in themselves that they miss.

Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? 

I’m a soccer mom and the mom of a gymnast. My husband and I own a beef cattle and pasture pig business. I read, travel, paint, crochet, quilt, photograph sporting events, and watch Netflix. Whew, that’s a Iot, isn’t it?

What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

I love Alexander McCall Smith’s Number One Ladies Detective Agency Series. The voices of his characters are so well written, and his descriptions of the scenery and locations are wonderful. They are gentle mysteries and yet you want to find out where he hides the twist!

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

One and a half books all total

Do you believe in writer’s block?

I believe in writer’s lament, writer’s apathy, and writer’s boredom. If you are truly in love with a story it will fight its way out. If not, it may need some time to cook. Set it aside and wait for it; it will tell you when it’s ready.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I can’t wait for the day that this becomes a problem for me!

Are you a plotter or a pantser?

The Traveling Way was a total pantser; it clawed its way out of me. I wrote feverishly because I wanted to know what was going to happen. I experienced the story with my characters.

After I finished, I did a lot of research and felt like I was “supposed” to plot, so I plotted book two (the sequel). I’m struggling because I feel like the story has already been told through the plot. 

You know that feeling when you try to reread a book, but you already know what’s coming so it becomes less exciting? That’s where I’m at right now.

What author/books are you currently reading?

I’m listening to Helter Skelter right now, but I just finished Jenny Lawson’s books and Theodora Goss’ Athena Club Series. The way she weaves historical characters together is everything right about writing!

As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing?

My writing is like my life. There is some drama, some history, a little make believe, and a lot of heart. Like me, all of my characters are trying to do their best, but they mess up along the way. Mistakes are part of living and no one’s character should be solely based on one choice.

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Author Spotlight: Archer Hay

Neece Editorial is pleased to present our next author spotlight! Today, we have Archer Hay, a brother and sister writing team that takes the world by storm.

Who is Archer Hay?

Jim Archuletta and Kelly Hay are a brother and sister writing team that publishes under the pen name, “Archer Hay.” Jim lives in Alabama and Kelly lives in Wisconsin, yet their remote collaboration has resulted in four published books in their “Badge Of” humorous crime series:

“Badge of the Bone Ritual” (published 12/2018)
“Badge of the Phoenix” (published 1/2019)
“Badge of the Desert Sage” (published 2/2019)
“Badge of the Waxing Moon” (published 4/2019)

The “Badge Of” series follows the investigations of a modern witch detective and a colorful cast of law enforcement and civilian friends. It’s like a mashup of “Brooklyn 99” (if you swapped out Tina Fey for the Andy Samberg role) and “Dateline” with a tinge of modern witchcraft.

Jim is a police officer and Kelly was a lawyer for 20 years before retiring to write books full-time. As such, their stories feature very realistic legal and law enforcement details. However, humor remains the foundation of their writing.

Other fun facts about Jim and Kelly include:

Jim is an identical twin and served in the U.S. Marine Corps. Kelly was in the Miss Nebraska pageant and was formerly the Editor in Chief of two scholarly legal publications. In a survey among their siblings, Jim was voted as the “funniest” and Kelly was voted as the “oldest.”

Want to know more about Archer Hay?

Follow them on social media or check out their website:

twitter: @AuthorArcherHay (Jim); @Ke11yDodd (Kelly)

Instagram: @archer.hay (archer(dot)hay)

Facebook: @archerhay (no dot)

https://www.archerhay.com

Interview:

1. What genre/s do you write in? And why?

Jim: Humorous genres, yet no genre goes unnoticed.

Kelly:  So far, we have only published humorous mysteries. But we have a thriller, a paranormal romance, and even some erotic poetry in our hearts. On second thought, we should probably keep it there.

2. Tell me about your WIP. 

Jim: Our current WIP is Dive Bar Detective.

Kelly: It’s a cozy mystery about bartender, Brandy Alexander, and her amateur investigations at Dive Bar, “Olive or Twist.” It’s like a mashup of “Cheers,” “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and your city’s local crime reports. Or like a boozy Scooby Doo for adults.

3. What writer (living or dead) would you most want to have dinner with? Why?

Jim: Gail Z. Martin because she’s the shit, and she secretly knows she wants me in her life!

Kelly: (living) Rainbow Rowell. We went to a leadership conference together in high school and went to the same college. We probably know a lot of the same people and have a lot of the same life experiences. It would be fun to have dinner and chat about it ALL. (dead): C.S. Lewis. His wife died of cancer when she was young. My husband died of cancer when he was young. We’d talk it out.

4. What’s your writing process like? For example, where and when do you like to write? Do you write every single day? 

Jim: I tell a tale and Kellus turns it into 2,000 words a day. We write daily.

Kelly: I’m “Kellus.” And, yes–Jim gives me his ideas (sometimes very general; sometimes very specific) and I write them into a scene or chapter. I try to write a minimum of 2,000 words per day. Writing is my job. I sit down at my desk at 8:00 a.m. and edit the prior day’s assignment (based upon the changes/corrections Jim gave me the night before). I then write and research the new assignment and send it to Jim around 11:00 a.m. Between 8:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m., I also usually talk to Jim on the phone several times to ask questions or tell him my ideas. We laugh until we can’t talk or breathe and almost pee ourselves. Then in the afternoon, I manage the administrative tasks of our writing business: social media, marketing, querying, etc. It is a full-time job for sure. 

5. What do you think makes a good story or poem?

Jim: Go light on the detail. I don’t want five pages of detail leading into the meat of a story. 

Kelly: Entertainment value and technical accuracy. I don’t want the editing (or lack thereof) to become a distraction, and I read almost purely for enjoyment–so I want the story to be enjoyable, satisfying, and memorable.

6. If you could give one piece of writing advice to your past self, what would it be and why?

Jim: Past advice would be, “write down ALL ideas.”

Kelly: I would tell myself to quit lawyering and start writing full-time a lot sooner.

7. What’s your day job?

Jim: Police Officer

Kelly: Lawyer (retired)

8. Other than writing, what passions/hobbies do you have? 

Jim: Watching horror movies, gardening, and complaining about work!

Kelly: I’m the lead singer in several cover bands. I also dabble in designing book covers.

9. What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

Jim: My favorite would have to be “Elric Saga.”

Kelly: “More Natural ‘Cures’ Revealed” by Kevin Trudeau. It might possibly be the worst book ever written, but it is comedy gold! On a more serious note, I would have to say, “Screwtape Letters” by C.S. Lewis. Not nearly enough people are familiar with the book. It MUST be read. And read again. 

10. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Jim: Three

Kelly: They are part of a new series that is out on query at the moment.

11. Do you believe in writer’s block?

Jim: What is writer’s block?

Kelly: No. We do not. We also believe that most authors who claim to have “imposter syndrome” and are misusing the term.

12. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

Jim: I do read them, and then I call Kelly and discuss.

Kelly: I read them, but unless they give detailed feedback, they are not very useful to me as a writer. However, I do believe reviews are enormously useful to readers.

13. Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Jim: 110 percent pantsers

Kelly: We are hard-core pantsers. We plan nothing, plot nothing, and usually start with only a vague one-line story idea. We never know from day to day what we will write tomorrow.

14. What author/books are you currently reading?

Jim: Believe it or not, I’m currently reading nothing. I’m too busy with my summer work schedule.

Kelly: Jim is *supposed* to be reading a bunch of cozy mysteries I assigned him as market research.

 15. As a closer, what do you want people to remember about you and your writing?

Jim: Remember that you were entertained and pass the enjoyment onto the next lad.

Kelly: When people think of “Archer Hay” books, I hope they will uniformly remember them as being well-written and pure entertainment.  I like to think our books are the perfect palate cleanser in between dark and heavy reads–something a reader can pick up and read in a day or two that will clear their mind and lift their spirit, but that caters to people who like smart, high-quality writing.

Thanks for joining me for today’s Author Spotlight. Check back regularly! Most weeks, I will highlight a different author on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Want to know more about Neece Editorial?

Follow me on Social Media:

FACEBOOK: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
INSTAGRAM: @JENNABNEECEWRITES
TWITTER: @JENNABNEECE

Want to support Neece Editorial?

Donators get discounts! https://www.gofundme.com/f/neece-editorial-services-amp-publications-startup&rcid=r01-156252629414-64dcef5c3d3c4dba&pc=ot_co_campmgmt_w

Create your website at WordPress.com
Get started